Sales Presentation Design

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Posts collected to help you design effective sales presentations that offer visual support to a carefully considered script | from our blog

Delivering memorable presentations requires more than a well-designed PowerPoint deck. Although visual-led presentation design is undoubtedly important (nobody is advocating bullet-point lists here) graphics alone do not tackle the deep-rooted problem that most poor sales presentations face. What is the presentation sales message? Only when you have a clear, comprehendible answer to this question can you begin to consider the matter of presentation design.

This collection of posts illustrates how the design and delivery of memorable sales presentations lies in the ability of the presenter to pull off a truly integrated performance. That is, when the presentation slides offer seamless graphic support to a benefits driven script...



Are You Interested in Better Sales Presentation Design?

Our free advice library offers useful presentation tips in a variety of key areas with a range of unique documents available to download. PowerPoint SmartArt, the Expert Guide, introduces the idea of using a basic presentation design tool to maximise audience engagement. SmartArt is an efficient, easy-to-use system for creating impressive diagrams with concise text. Used in PowerPoint, it can offer the perfect graphic support to drive your script and bring an element of synchronicity to your overall presentation message.

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You may also be interested in these posts on presentation theory...

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We commonly believe PowerPoint was launched by Microsoft almost 30 years ago - right? Wrong. It was invented by a Scot called James Pillans more than 200 years ago...

Exceptional delivery really helps the audience remember your message. Sadly, too many presentations fail through two crucial stages being skipped: 'practice' and 'rehearsal'...

A previous post explained the importance of timing to the success of your presentation. In this gives more detail on how to create a plan (and, more importantly, how to stick to it).

This principle says that redundant information interferes with learning and material being retained in long term memory. Giving people more information, does not necessarily increase their ability to remember the key learning points.

This principle is to all about choosing the best mode for communicating your message. Generally speaking people prefer to listen to a well-illustrated presentation than read an explanation – even if both use similar illustrations...

Good speakers need to be both heard and understood. Being heard is a question of volume and being understood concerns articulation - and a wine bottle cork can help you with the latter...

This principle says that close synchronicity between what you say (narration) and what you show (supporting graphics) helps audience members remember your message.

There is an increasing demand for good, HD video. Converting your PowerPoint presentations into HD video is reasonably straight forward. That said, many people are often left feeling frustrated with their results.

This principle, known as Spacial Contiguity, simply says that words and illustrations relating to one another are better understood if positioned close together...

Using multiple media greatly increases audience retention - so, if you're think of making a speech, you ought to seriously consider illustrating it...


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